I use Evernote. Some business people think Evernote is in big trouble. They’re right about the reasons why:

Several former employees believe a lack of focus hampered Evernote’s growth. Instead of focusing on its core note-taking product and on converting users to the paid service, Evernote spent more time releasing a bunch of new products and features that only helped it grab news headlines, they said.

Evernote still has no Linux client. It has a web client, but that’s half-assed at best — you can’t even edit the dates on notes. They added reminders you can check off, but there’s no hierarchy support, it’s just a flat list. You can set a date on a reminder, but the reminder doesn’t go away until it’s due — it just sits there with the date displayed next to it. So in practice, reminders are useless for birthdays, project planning, and pretty much anything else you’d want to use them for.

Oh, sure, you can put checklists inside notes, and those can be multi-level. But then you have to remember to go look at them, and the editing facilities are rudimentary because the implementation is just a rich text editor with a box that can either be checked or unchecked.

Yeah, rich text. Not HTML, not Markdown, not ODF, not anything sane and standard, instead some Evernote-specific format with an Evernote-specific XML representation. Until quite recently, the rich text editing wasn’t even interoperable between the Mac and Android clients — I’d edit something to look nice in one, and it would look like garbage in the other.

Basically, I keep waiting for someone to build a self-hosted Evernote clone with a web client and API, and at that point I’ll probably jump ship.

Sure, there are plenty of people trying to launch other proprietary alternatives. Centrallo looks good, but is even more expensive than Evernote. Google Keep lacks functionality and will probably die soon; they already launched and killed one notebook product. Microsoft OneNote looks good and is cheap, but obviously they’re even less likely to make a Linux client than Evernote. So for the time being, Evernote it is, but I really wish it was better.


Talking point vs pesky facts

The talking point: “That Oregon college campus was a gun-free zone! What we need is concealed carry at colleges!”

The reality:

What is clear, Erika Soto Lamb, communications director at Everytown for Gun Safety, wrote in an email, is that “Oregon law actually forces colleges to allow guns on campus grounds”.

Oregon is one of fewer than a dozen states, along with more conservative counterparts like Mississippi and Utah, which allow concealed carry on college campuses.

And specifically, a man named John Parker had a gun with him on campus during the shootings.