Howls of derisive laughter, Bruce!

Microsoft Corp. itself was exposed to the virus-like attack that crippled global Internet activity last weekend because it failed to install crucial fixes to its own software on many Microsoft computer servers. Although Microsoft contends its failure to keep up with its own updates did not cause major problems, security experts said it points to a larger issue: Microsoft’s process for keeping customers’ software secure is hugely flawed. The virus-like attack, called “slammer” or “sapphire,” exploited a known flaw in Microsoft’s “SQL Server 2000” database software, used by businesses, government agencies, universities and others around the world.

San Francisco, part 5

Wednesday we got a courtesy car pick-up from the rental company. We rented a Toyota Prius. I was intrigued by how well a hybrid gasoline/electric car would work, and this seemed a good chance to give one a thorough test drive. Or rather, for sara to give one a thorough test drive… What we hadn’t been expecting was that it was a fully tricked-out Prius, complete with GPS satellite navigation system and route finder DVD-ROM for the onboard computer.

Be afraid, be very afraid…

Russian experts have identified a serious flaw in Microsoft database software used to track nuclear warheads, which results in gradual data loss. The buggy software has been in use for over ten years. Los Alamos uses the same software, and has destroyed its paper records. Locating the ‘missing’ warheads will require a full inspection of all US nuclear sites, at an estimated cost of $1 billion. In the mean time, terrorists wanting to steal warheads can pick one of the ‘missing’ ones, and nobody will notice…