US vs UK

A US court has ruled that authorities cannot force people to incriminate themselves by divulging their encryption passwords. This is in marked contrast to the UK, where the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) makes it a crime to decline to hand over all your incriminating files if the police demand it. If the case doesn’t involve national security, you can be put in jail for two years. If it does, five years.

Something to celebrate

The Guardian reports: A US court yesterday fired a shot across the bows of those one prosecutor described as “snake oil salesmen” by recommending that the man thought to be the eighth most prolific “spammer” in the world should be jailed for nine years. Jeremy Jaynes, 30, of North Carolina, was found guilty, along with his sister, Jessica DeGroot, of sending out thousands of fraudulent emails which conned millions of dollars from unwitting victims.